Sunday, July 5, 2015
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by Alhaji Alhasan Abdulai The Ghana Blind Union along with the rest of the country express shock and disappointment at the cancelation of the recent...

SPORTS

Scores of football and entertainment stars on Sunday endorsed UNAIDS Ghana’s "Protect the Goal" (PtG) campaign which seeks to contribute towards the attainment of...

Asamoah Gyan, the captain of Ghana’s senior national football team, the Black Stars, has made a donation of USD10,000 to Kwabena Kwabena’s Save a...

Jerry Vandam By El Akyereko Frimpong Follow the writer on Twitter: @AkyerekOfficial Belgian Pro League side Waasland-Beveren have decided not to renew the contract of Ghanaian pair...

Ghana Under-20 striker Samuel Tetteh has been handed a trial session by Danish side Midtjylland. The Ghanaian youngster, who impressed during the 2015 World Youth...

TRAVEL

Photo taken on July 3, 2015 shows an aerial view of Hailongtun Fortress in southwest China's Guizhou Province. Tusi sites -- the remains of an ancient political system adopted by Chinese emperors to govern ethnic minority regions in south-central and southwest China -- were inscribed in the World Heritage List on Saturday. The inscribed sites, located in mountainous areas, are Laosicheng in Hunan Province, Tangya in Hubei Province and Hailongtun Fortress in Guizhou Province. Tusi literally means hereditary tribal headmen appointed by Chinese emperors to govern the often unruly ethnic minority regions in the central and western parts of south China, where the specific tribal governance system was adopted from the 13th to the early 20th century. (Xinhua/Liu Xu) (wyo)
Tusi sites, which offer a glimpse into the ancient chieftain system that governed ethnic minorities in southwest China for eight centuries, have entered UNESCO's...
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