They were among a total 1,404 female sex workers between 13 and 23 years, who presented themselves for the voluntary test conducted by the Hope for Future Generations (HFFG), a health-centered Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO).

wpid-Sex-workers.jpgMrs. Irene Sawerteh, the Programme Manager of the HFFG, announced this at a meeting with the organisation’s peer educators, in Sunyani.

She expressed regret that though HIV/AIDS was still spreading, the education on the disease had gone down, and called for intensified public education, especially in rural areas, to minimise its spread.

Mrs. Sawerteh said public stigmatisation and discrimination of HIV/AIDS patients were still high and measures ought to be stepped up to control it.

She pointed out that research had shown that because of the stigma, many young boys and girls were always reluctant to check their status.

Mrs. Sawerteh said that the disease had no respect for social class, adding that, the best way to be in control of the disease was to know your status towards remaining negative or leading healthy life when positive.

She commended the peer educators for their hard work and asked them to follow up with those who had tested positive so that they would be put on medication.

Mrs. Rose Balaaboore, the Brong-Ahafo Regional Programme’s Manager of the HFFG, said the NGO had intensified HIV/AIDS campaign in the Region to improve on the detection rate.

She advised young boys and girls who could not control their sexual desires to avoid unprotected sex and ensure that they used condoms at all times.

Source: GNA

By Dennis Peprah, GNA,

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