Accra Residents Unaware Of World Malaria Day – Survey

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Malaria
Malaria

A survey conducted by the Ghana News Agency (GNA) in Accra shows that people in Accra are not aware of the 2017 World Malaria Day (WMD) which is being celebrated on the theme: “End Malaria for good; Invest in Malaria Prevention.”

Most of the interviewees said they did not hear about the Day on either radio or television.

Mrs Lydia Amponsah, a trader at Tema station in Accra told the GNA she was not aware of the Day.

She, however, stated that some of the symptoms of malaria were loss of appetite, weakness and body pains.

“I visit the hospital to receive professional treatment from a doctor,” she added.

According to Mr Lawer Ronald Kwablah, a sales representative, he depends on self- medication such as visiting the pharmacy for treatment of malaria.

He said he did not go to the hospital because of the long process in gaining medical attention “especially at the government hospitals”.

Mrs Abena Oduro, tomatoes seller, said though she was not aware that about the WMD, she was informed that symptoms of malaria were yellowish urine, paled face and cold.

Mrs Oduro said she depended on pharmacy medication for treatment but “I take in herbal medicines such as Rooter mixture and Angel herbal mixture when symptoms are very severe”.

Mrs Afia Yeboah, a trader said she relied on herbal medication such as Agbeve tonic when she experienced symptoms like weakness and high temperature to treat malaria.

She however sends her children to the hospital for effective treatment.

Mr Mike Asiedu, an IT Manager was also not aware of the WMD though he listens to the radio all the time.

He said some symptoms of malaria include “funny feelings in the joint”, dizziness and cold.

He noted that as a first aid, he blended bitter leave, sieved it, and then drank it because it was very effective for him.

A civil servant who refused to disclose his name said he saw some people in WMD T-shirts to create awareness before he got to know about the celebration.

He said he visited the hospital for treatment when symptoms of malaria avails itself.

Malaria is caused by Plasmodium Falciparum through the bite of anopheles mosquito.

According to the WHO, although considerable progress has been made in the fight against malaria, the burden of the disease is still very high, especially in Africa, with the region accounting for 80 per cent of the global malaria cases in 2015.

Considering the economic impact of the disease on Africa, which is estimated to cost $ 12 billion every year, there is the need for further efforts to reduce this preventable disease to the very minimum.

In Ghana, malaria is still endemic in all 10 the regions, however, there is a financial constraints now, and in the foreseeable future, serve as the greatest threat to maintaining malaria prevention.

According to research funding trends by the public sector and donors are discouraging, leaving an annual funding gap of an estimated $ 2.6 billion for malaria prevention from 2011 to 2020.

Ghana is said to have recorded about 10 million cases of malaria in 2015, contributing 38.1 OPD cases.

According to the WHO, although considerable progress has been made in the fight against malaria, the burden of the disease is still very high, especially in Africa, with the region accounting for 80 per cent of the global malaria cases in 2015.

The Organisation says there were 214 million new cases of malaria worldwide in 2015, with 438,000 deaths.

The WHO said from 2000 and 2015, 57 countries achieved reductions in new malaria cases of least 75 per cent.
GNA/www.newsghana.com.gh

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