Photo taken on Nov. 26, 2015 shows a truck loaded with sacks of agricultural produce along the muddy Sironko-Mbale road at Bugusege trading centre, eastern Uganda. As a country where over 80% of the population relies on agriculture, the Uganda government is prioritizing growth of infrastructure to economically viable areas to ease access to the markets. (Xinhua/Daniel Edyegu)
Photo taken on Nov. 26, 2015 shows a truck loaded with sacks of agricultural produce along the muddy Sironko-Mbale road at Bugusege trading centre, eastern Uganda. As a country where over 80% of the population relies on agriculture, the Uganda government is prioritizing growth of infrastructure to economically viable areas to ease access to the markets. (Xinhua/Daniel Edyegu)

Prof. Simon Cudjoe Fialor in an interview with rawgist.com stated emphatically that “as long as standards are missing in our system, we are joking”.

Photo taken on Nov. 26, 2015 shows a truck loaded with sacks of agricultural produce along the muddy Sironko-Mbale road at Bugusege trading centre, eastern Uganda. As a country where over 80% of the population relies on agriculture, the Uganda government is prioritizing growth of infrastructure to economically viable areas to ease access to the markets. (Xinhua/Daniel Edyegu)
Photo taken on Nov. 26, 2015 shows a truck loaded with sacks of agricultural produce along the muddy Sironko-Mbale road at Bugusege trading centre, eastern Uganda. As a country where over 80% of the population relies on agriculture, the Uganda government is prioritizing growth of infrastructure to economically viable areas to ease access to the markets. (Xinhua/Daniel Edyegu)

He lamented how market women use size to determine prices and how people taste foodstuffs such as gari before determining if they want to buy or not. “The only way to find if gari is good for u, is to take a sample and put on your tongue to see if it appeals to your palate. That’s not good enough the gari should be sealed”, he stated.

Currently, tins of various products are used to measure foodstuff in the market. Truckloads of cassava are measured in “poles” a measuring standard that is not clearly defined and has been the recipe for confusion in many agro transactions between farmers and market women.

Prof. Fialor believes Agricultural technocrats and institutions have not been innovative enough and the setting of standards has been left to the market women who are largely illiterate and lack the expertise.
“The bottomline is, there is no money but some of these things don’t require money to begin, they just require putting the best foot forward and then finding the money to support it later”, Prof. Fialor explained.

-Bernard Buachi/rawgist.com

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