Children with Visual Impairment needs societal support for growth

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Visual Impairment

The Central Regional Department of Children has called on families and societies to provide the needed support for children with visual impairments for their growth.

It said children with visual impairment were not different from other kids, therefore needed the full attention and assistance to enable them to achieve their full potential.

Ms Grace Kensah, the Assistant Programmes Officer of the Department at a public sensitization forum noted that though children with visual impairment could not see, they had all other senses to support them to see things around them.

The sensitization forum formed part of the Holistic Development Programme for Visually Impaired Children(HODVIC) to provide adequate support for the holistic development of children aged zero to eight with visual impairment to ensure their full participation.

The program embarked on by the Department of Children under the Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Protection (MoGCSP) is sponsored by the Royal Dutch Visio and the Presbyterian Health Services.

It timely intervention which seeks to promote early detection, proper referral, and treatment as well as appropriate care and management of children with visual impairment.

Ms Kensah said societies must be the eyes of visual impairment children to ensure they partake fully in their day-to-day activities

The Assistant Programs Officer appealed to parents with visually impaired children to promptly keep an eye on their children to ensure they were protected and safe always.

She urged all to desist from all forms of discriminatory activities against visually impaired children to ensure their development.

Mr George Frimpong, the Regional President of the Ghana Federation for Persons with Disability (GFPD) said negative discriminatory activities towards PWDs hinder their development.

He called on society to provide a safe and friendly environment for PWDs to help their growth to contribute to development in the country.

Mr Frimpong noted that cultural and traditional barriers hinder the safety of most PWDs, hence, called for the need to seek hospital care promptly for early detection and treatment.

The Department engaged students, market women, and media outlets to educate Ghanaians on the need to care for visually impaired children and how society could help assist them in achieving their full potential.

As part of the two days sensitization activities, the Department screened more than 200 school pupils and market women with the Cape Coast Metropolis.

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