Germany’s far-right AfD adopts anti-EU agenda ahead of election

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Tino Chrupalla (l), AfD national spokesman, raises his voting card next to Alexander Gauland (2nd from right), AfD parliamentary party leader, and Jörg Meuthen (r), AfD national spokesman, in the Dresden exhibition hall at the AfD national party conference. One topic is the resolution of the election program for the Bundestag elections. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa
Tino Chrupalla (l), AfD national spokesman, raises his voting card next to Alexander Gauland (2nd from right), AfD parliamentary party leader, and Jörg Meuthen (r), AfD national spokesman, in the Dresden exhibition hall at the AfD national party conference. One topic is the resolution of the election program for the Bundestag elections. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/dpa

(dpa) – Germany’s far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) decided Sunday on a solidly anti-EU platform ahead of the federal elections in September.

“We consider Germany’s exit from the European Union and the establishment of a new European economic and interest group to be necessary,” the party asserted in a resolution carried by some 400 of 600 delegates at a party congress in Dresden.

It was the first time that the party has called so clearly for a German exit from the EU in an electoral platform.

Party leader Joerg Meuthen, a member of the European Parliament, had rejected this course. “Politics is the art of the possible,” he said.

“#Dexit” – short for #Deutschland + exit – was among the top topics on Twitter in Germany Sunday.

The deputy head of the pro-business Free Democrats, Alexander Graf Lambsdorff, accused the AfD of resorting to nationalism. Dexit would be the “end of the EU and the internal market, our most important export market,” he asserted.

The AfD also called for curbs on migration along a Japanese model, and adopted a “coronavirus resolution” rejecting any compulsory tests or vaccinations.

The AfD did not decide on who to send into the elections as its top candidate, but decided it should be a leadership duo to be determined later.

The party founded in 2013 is the biggest opposition group in the Bundestag, but other parties have rejected outright the idea of forming a coalition with the AfD after the elections scheduled for September 26.

The party has undergone years of turmoil, with its right-wing extremist factions going head-to-head with more moderate groupings.

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