A policeman stands guard outside Westgate shopping mall, in Nairobi, Kenya, on July 18, 2015. Kenya's upscale shopping mall, Westgate, which had been closed nearly two years ago after a terrorist attack that claimed 67 lives, was reopened on Saturday amid tight security.(Xinhua/Pan Siwei)
A policeman stands guard outside Westgate shopping mall, in Nairobi, Kenya, on July 18, 2015. Kenya's upscale shopping mall, Westgate, which had been closed nearly two years ago after a terrorist attack that claimed 67 lives, was reopened on Saturday amid tight security.(Xinhua/Pan Siwei)

Kenya’s Ministry of Internal Security and partners will hasten modernization of the country’s police force through investment in new technologies, training and improved working condition in order to boost war on crime, officials said on Monday.

Fred Matiang’i, the Cabinet Secretary for Internal Security, said creation of a modern and people-centered police service is a priority in the light of evolving security threats in the country.

“We are committed to revamping the national police service to help deal with threats to public security such as urban crime, terrorism, homicide and resource based conflicts in remote parts of the country,” Matiang’i remarked.

He spoke in Nairobi during the unveiling of a report by the civilian police oversight authority which indicates that Kenya has made progress in transformation of law enforcement agencies thanks to enactment of new laws, investments in modern technologies and improved public engagement.

Matiang’i said Kenya aims to achieve the global threshold on police reforms through enhanced oversight, improved perks and living conditions for law enforcement agencies as well as engagement with the public and civil society.

“Our goal is to sustain effective policing in line with global rating index. The national police service will be expected to discharge its mandate of providing security to civilians and their property without breaking the law,” said Matiang’i.

Kenya has adopted international best practices to improve the performance of national police service in the light of rapidly evolving internal and external security threats.

Johnstone Kavuludi, the Chairman of National Police Service Commission, said creation of law enforcement agencies that are well equipped, trained and responsive to the needs of civilians is key to promoting growth and stability in Kenya.

“Reforms are critical to inject meritocracy in the police service but more importantly, we must provide incentives to police officers who risk their lives on a daily basis to protect us from harm,” said Kavuludi.

He noted that incentives like medical insurance, modern housing and training opportunities have boosted the morale of police officers. Enditem

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