Memorial for 30,000 people who died of Covid-19 in New York

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People wait in line at a New York State Department of Health COVID-19 antibody testing center at Steve's 9th Street Market in Brooklyn, New York, the United States, on April 25, 2020. Global COVID-19 deaths surpassed 200,000 on Saturday afternoon, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University. A total of 200,698 people have died of the disease as of 1:50 p.m. (1750 GMT) among 2,865,938 cases worldwide, the CSSE data showed. The United States suffered the most fatalities at 52,782 as its total cases reached 924,576. (Photo by Michael Nagle/Xinhua)
People wait in line at a New York State Department of Health COVID-19 antibody testing center at Steve's 9th Street Market in Brooklyn, New York, the United States, on April 25, 2020. Global COVID-19 deaths surpassed 200,000 on Saturday afternoon, according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University. A total of 200,698 people have died of the disease as of 1:50 p.m. (1750 GMT) among 2,865,938 cases worldwide, the CSSE data showed. The United States suffered the most fatalities at 52,782 as its total cases reached 924,576. (Photo by Michael Nagle/Xinhua)

dpa/GNA – The city of New York held a virtual memorial Sunday for the more than 30,000 people who have died of Covid-19 since the first death after a confirmed coronavirus infection exactly one year ago.

Musicians from the New York Philharmonic were among artists who performed in a live broadcast Sunday evening live from the Brooklyn waterfront.

Meanwhile, images of some of the dead were projected onto the pillars of Brooklyn Bridge.

“Tonight, we honor the lives lost to this horrible pandemic and join together as a city to mourn, heal and look toward a brighter future,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement.

“Voices from across the city will join as one to stand in solidarity and demonstrate how we remain strong, hopeful and determined.”

De Blasio came under fire for not moving quickly enough to shut down businesses and schools in spring last year, when New York City became the national epicentre of the pandemic.

Lockdowns, quarantine requirements for travellers and social distancing rules have helped the city gain control of its infection rate.

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