The Customs Division of the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) has explained that it is not all containers delivered at the port terminals by importers that are subjected to examination before payment of import duty is effected,and the goods cleared.

Some of the containers which by GRA regulations do not go through physical examination before they are cleared are:  containers for diplomatic missions, free zone companies, transit containers for neighbouring land-locked countries and Gold Card holders (large companies like Unilever, Cocoa Processing Company, Pioneer Food Cannery, etc) which do regular business with Customs and those going to be scanned.

Mr. Peter A. Alu, Chief Collector, Customs Division of GRA in-charge of Africa Coastal Services (ACS) an off-dock container devanning facility at the Tema Port has disclosed.

He said shipping lines bring the cargo and release the documentation to their agents, the Destination Inspection Companies (DIC) authenticate the documents and issue a final certificate that is Final Classification and Valuation Report (FCVR), stating the consignment value and the amount to be paid.

Mr. Alu explained that, all goods which are meant to be examined are physically examined and requisite payment effected by the importer before the goods are cleared.

An average of 4500 containers are received at ACS alone every month  and in other to ensure quick clearance of Cargo at the terminal, management has requested importers who face delays in clearance of their Cargoes to apply for physical examination instead of waiting in a long queue for a long period to have their goods scanned.

Mr. Alu appealed to the ACS management to acquire more equipment at the terminal to ensure faster loading and off loading of Cargo.

One major challenge Customs faces at the terminal is under-invoicing of goods which causes delay because his officers have to recover the short collection by assessing for the appropriate import duty to be paid.

Penalty, in this case, varies but the minimum is 100% of the total duty to be paid.

Mr. Alu urged all importers to declare the exact goods they import so as to avoid paying penalty when caught.

He said the problem with demurrage which importers often complain about is being discussed with the Ghana Shippers Authority, and the shipping lines and hope something better will come out. Goods attract demurrage after thirty days of clearance and other subsequent days.\

By Kwame Mensah – Tema

Customs denies fraudulent clearance practices

By Kwame Mensah – Tema

 The Customs Division of the Ghana Revenue Authority (GRA) has explained that it is not all containers delivered at the port terminals by importers that are subjected to examination before payment of import duty is effected,and the goods cleared.

Some of the containers which by GRA regulations do not go through physical examination before they are cleared are:  containers for diplomatic missions, free zone companies, transit containers for neighbouring land-locked countries and Gold Card holders (large companies like Unilever, Cocoa Processing Company, Pioneer Food Cannery, etc) which do regular business with Customs and those going to be scanned.

Mr. Peter A. Alu, Chief Collector, Customs Division of GRA in-charge of Africa Coastal Services (ACS) an off-dock container devanning facility at the Tema Port has disclosed.

He said shipping lines bring the cargo and release the documentation to their agents, the Destination Inspection Companies (DIC) authenticate the documents and issue a final certificate that is Final Classification and Valuation Report (FCVR), stating the consignment value and the amount to be paid.

Mr. Alu explained that, all goods which are meant to be examined are physically examined and requisite payment effected by the importer before the goods are cleared.

An average of 4500 containers are received at ACS alone every month  and in other to ensure quick clearance of Cargo at the terminal, management has requested importers who face delays in clearance of their Cargoes to apply for physical examination instead of waiting in a long queue for a long period to have their goods scanned.

Mr. Alu appealed to the ACS management to acquire more equipment at the terminal to ensure faster loading and off loading of Cargo.

One major challenge Customs faces at the terminal is under-invoicing of goods which causes delay because his officers have to recover the short collection by assessing for the appropriate import duty to be paid.

Penalty, in this case, varies but the minimum is 100% of the total duty to be paid.

Mr. Alu urged all importers to declare the exact goods they import so as to avoid paying penalty when caught.

He said the problem with demurrage which importers often complain about is being discussed with the Ghana Shippers Authority, and the shipping lines and hope something better will come out. Goods attract demurrage after thirty days of clearance and other subsequent days.

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