Zimbabwean dancers perform traditional Makishi dance at Old Mutual Theatre, Harare, Zimbabwe, on Oct. 9, 2015. Makishi dance, originally performed at the end of an annual initiation ritual for boys between the ages of eight and twelve in rural Zimbabwe and Zambia, is particularly known for involving beautifully painted masks that represent different spiritual characters. Today, there is an increasing demand for makishi dancers at social gatherings and party rallies, as they are less performed for initiation rituals. The dance was recognized as a UNESCO oral and intangible cultural heritage in 2008. (Xinhua/Xu Lingui)
Zimbabwean dancers perform traditional Makishi dance at Old Mutual Theatre, Harare, Zimbabwe, on Oct. 9, 2015. Makishi dance, originally performed at the end of an annual initiation ritual for boys between the ages of eight and twelve in rural Zimbabwe and Zambia, is particularly known for involving beautifully painted masks that represent different spiritual characters. Today, there is an increasing demand for makishi dancers at social gatherings and party rallies, as they are less performed for initiation rituals. The dance was recognized as a UNESCO oral and intangible cultural heritage in 2008. (Xinhua/Xu Lingui)

Through the efforts of the Koforidua office of the Ghana News Agency, which first broke the story last year; the benevolence of the Member of Parliament for Okere, Mr Dan Kwaku Botwe; and the Akuapem North Municipal Chief Executive, Mr George Opare-Addo, the community leaders mobilised resources to put up a two-roomed house, which made her return possible.

It would be recalled that last year, the GNA carried a story of a woman who was accused by a fetish priest of killing her 68-year old brother, claiming the gods revealed that to him.

Led by the fetish priest, the youth beat the old lady and stripped her naked. They also demolished her house.

A daughter of the victim, consequently, sent the woman to Koforidua to live with her until a good Samaritan informed the GNA of her plight and took the matter to the appropriate quarters.

The daughter and her family were squatters at the defunct Railways Station at Koforidua.

Following the GNA’s appeal, Madam Odi was issued with a medical form to seek medical attention at the Koforidua Central Hospital, where she was detained and treated.

Mr Botwe paid for the cost of treatment, while the funds mobilised through the GNA’s appeal provided for her upkeep and the rebuilding of her home.

The chief of the village, Nana Henaku Amoyaw, praised the GNA for mobilising support and Police assistance to enable the woman to return to the village, saying without the Agency’s intervention Madam Odi could have died.

He said the GNA had given practical meaning to journalism by not only voicing out the plight of the woman but making sure that the right thing was done.

He expressed the hope that the GNA’s example would be emulated by other media houses to bring hope to society.

The chief gave the assurance that the unfortunate incident would never happen again and said the perpetrators of crime had left the village.

However, two persons have been arrested, while Police investigation continues.

By Bertha Badu-Agyei, GNA

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