Rebirth of violence in South Sudan condemned

UN mission condemns resurgence of violence in S. Sudan

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Over two hundred Nepalese peacekeepers arrive in Juba from the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), to reinforce the military component of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). UN Photo/Isaac Billy
Over two hundred Nepalese peacekeepers arrive in Juba from the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), to reinforce the military component of the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). UN Photo/Isaac Billy

The UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) has condemned renewed fighting in South Sudan over the week which has resulted in numerous casualties.

UNMISS
UNMISS
In a statement received on Saturday as South Sudan marked the fifth independence anniversary, the UN mission called on the authorities to probe clashes in the course of this week in Juba, Wau and Bentiu.

“UNMISS reiterates its calls on all parties to put an end to the ongoing fighting and refrain from inflicting further violence against innocent civilians,” it said in a statement.

Ellen Margrethe Loej, head of the UNMISS, urged all parties to cease from engaging in violence and to focus on the implementation of the peace agreement for the benefit of all the people of South Sudan.

The UN mission said it remains resolved in fulfilling its mission in South Sudan and supporting the implementation of the Peace Agreement for a peaceful and prosperous country.

The UNMISS statement comes as clashes took place in the center of South Sudan’s capital on Friday evening.

Sporadic gunfire erupted outside the Presidential Palace when President Salva Kiir and First Vice President Riek Machar were inside the Palace for a meeting to discuss the clashes which occurred between their forces on Thursday evening.

At least five soldiers were killed and two others injured in fighting Thursday between the forces loyal to the two leaders.

Sudan People’s Liberation Army-In-Opposition (SPLA-1O) spokesman William Gatjiath confirmed on Saturday at least 115 people killed after Friday’s shooting.

However, the circumstances under which the shooting erupted remain unclear.

Aid agencies have warned that despite renewed hope after the peace agreement was signed in August 2015, violence continues to drive people from their villages and disrupts their lives.

The agencies said insecurity threatens communities all the way from Kajo-Keji in the south to Malakal in the north.

In recent days, fighting in Wau has torn the previously calm city apart, and forced an estimated 60,000 people to seek shelter in churches and makeshift camps.

The volatile security situation in many parts of the country has worsened an already dire humanitarian situation.

According to the agencies, over six million people need humanitarian assistance — more than half the population. Some two million people have been forced to flee their homes. Enditem

Source: Xinhua/NewsGhana.com.gh

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