South Sudanese women display cash vouchers at World Food Program (WFP) station in Mingkaman, South Sudan, Jan. 23, 2020. WFP cash transfers are helping many displaced elderly women and children who face risk of starvation. (Xinhua/Denis Elamu)
South Sudanese women display cash vouchers at World Food Program (WFP) station in Mingkaman, South Sudan, Jan. 23, 2020. WFP cash transfers are helping many displaced elderly women and children who face risk of starvation. (Xinhua/Denis Elamu)

As the novel coronavirus continues to disrupt livelihoods across the globe, South Sudanese women have shown their entrepreneurial spirit as the world’s youngest nation eases restrictions occasioned by the COVID-19 pandemic.

A spot check carried out by Xinhua indicated that many women have decided to embark on income-generating activities, especially selling of fruits and vegetables in the main streets of Juba despite harsh weather conditions.

“Since the outbreak of coronavirus, I have been struggling to feed my family. This is because there is no way they can survive during this pandemic without my efforts,” said Alima Dito, a mother of three.

Dito, who is in her late 50s, displayed her groceries at Juba’s Konyokony market and revealed she lost her husband during two decades of liberation struggle in her motherland.

The widow said that though there is no booming business currently in the capital, at least she wakes up every day to hustle for her family.

She said that placing food on the table is a big challenge though she is still struggling with her little business, adding that profits do not exceed 3,000 South Sudanese pounds (about 10 U.S. dollars) per day.

Mariam Abdallakarim, a businesswoman based in Gudele market, a suburb of Juba, admitted despite the COVID-19 outbreak, her business is sustaining the family.

“The market is somehow good and I am making a small profit but the virus is affecting my business,” said Abdallakarim.

She said that her food commodities business is experiencing little progress following the government’s decision to ease the rules and regulations meant to help contain the spread of the virus in the country.

Hellen Juju, a resident of Rajaf Payam, a suburb of Juba, located west of the river Nile said though she is earning low income from the business, she is determined to sustain it for the long haul.

“I have no other options apart from selling mixed goods in the market to cater for my family,” said Juju. Enditem

Disclaimer: News Ghana is not responsible for the reportage or opinions of contributors published on the website.

Send your news stories to [email protected] and via WhatsApp on +1-508-812-0505 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.