Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)
Two rhinoceros are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March. 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)

Zambia has approved a regional treaty aimed at conserving wildlife and other natural resources across international boundaries, the Times of Zambia reported on Monday.

Two elephants are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)
Two elephants are seen in the Chobe National Park, northern Botswana, March 24, 2015. The Kasane Conference on The Illegal Wildlife Trade was held on Tuesday in Kasane, the gateway to the Chobe National Park, with delegations from 35 countries and around 20 international organizations. (Xinhua/Lu Tianran)(azp)

Minister of Tourism and Arts Jean Kapata said Cabinet last week approved the bilateral treaty to establish the Malawi-Zambia Trans- Frontier Conservation to enhance the management and conservation of wildlife and other natural resources across the international boundaries.
She said the approval of the treaty was a go ahead symbol for Zambia to share its natural resources with Malawi.
Malawi approved the treaty a long time ago, she added.
The Zambian minister however said the only remaining part is for the leaders of the two countries to sign the treaty.
“We are waiting for the Heads of States of Malawi and Zambia to sign the treaty somewhere in mid-July this year,” she was quoted as saying by the paper.
According to her, the bilateral treaty would enable joint law enforcement operations between the two countries to protect natural resources and wildlife.
The project is being funded by the World Bank and Global Environment Fund who have given the two countries 4.8 million U.S. dollars, with Zambia getting 2.4 million dollars.
The project is part of a wider southern African region initiative meant to jointly manage shared natural and wildlife resources. Enditem

Source: Xinhua

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